Makaya McCraven – Beat Science

I was stoked to host the Ableton Live User Group in Portland last month. We had the rare opportunity of having the guest speaker Makaya McCraven. Makaya is a world-renowned jazz drummer. Pop Matters’ put him in the top jazz albums of 2015. In this Video Makaya MacCraven walks us through his creative process with editing, chopping, and working off the grid. Lots of gems in here, so enjoy.

Check out Makaya’s music at: https://www.makayamccraven.com/

By | 2017-09-06T18:42:25+00:00 September 5th, 2017|Ableton, Producers Blog, Sound Design Tech|0 Comments

Recording Multi-track with Ipad and Zoom H6

While working on my new Subaqueous Album, I came up with an idea. I wanted to record vocals with Marya Stark  but not in the studio. I wanted to trek out to a remote place in the woods and dive deep into the music. After much experimenting, I found out a way to use the Zoom H6 and the Ipad to record. We were able to do full multitracking, layering, and even editing out in the woods and it all fit in a backpack.

Here is the video walk through. Below that, I have some links to the app and gear used.

Here is a list of some of the things you might need. (more…)

Physical Modeling with Ableton Live and Chromaphone

One of the key techniques I use in my instrumentation is Physical Modeling. This type of synthesis has a unique and organic sound.  Wikipedia defines it as:

In sound synthesis, physical modelling synthesis refers to methods in which the waveform of the sound to be generated is computed by using a mathematicalmodel, being a set of equations and algorithms to simulate a physical source of sound, usually a musical instrument.

I also really like this image as a reference to how Physical Modeling does it. You can see how they have broken an instrument into its parts and used different synthesis to achieve a sound that emulates it.

Here is a video on my favorite Physical Modeling synth and an overview.

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By | 2017-06-28T19:49:44+00:00 February 21st, 2017|Ableton, Gear Review, Producers Blog, Sound Design Tech|0 Comments

Creating a Thick and Clean Kick

Getting your kick just right can be quite the task. I have been using this new VST called BigKick to quickly create the perfect sound for my mix.  Here is a video walkthrough of me using the VST, my thoughts, and some techniques.

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Check out BigKick at Plug-In Boutique 

Got any tips on synths and samples for a kick? Comment below.

By | 2017-06-28T19:49:47+00:00 February 21st, 2017|Ableton, Producers Blog, Sound Design Tech|0 Comments

Trap Vocal Edits in Ableton Live

Have you ever wanted to edit vocals to give that stuttered and pitched effect you hear in Trap? I put togeather a video of me editing some Silk Drop vocals. I use techniques like cutting up the vocal, re-pitching vocals, complex pro warp mode, and other things.

Wanted to give you an inside look on how I edit vocals this way.

If you are interested in other vocal techniques, check out my video on vocal effects and free audio effect rack.

I also made a video on working with backing vocals and chorusing.

Do you have any techniques you use for Trap Vocals? Plugins? Share in the comments.

By | 2017-06-28T19:49:53+00:00 January 20th, 2017|Ableton, Producers Blog, Sound Design Tech|0 Comments

List of Microtonal VST Synths and Plugins

To easily make microtonal music in Ableton Live, or other DAW’s, I find it’s best to use third party VST’s that support Scala files. That way you can pick your tuning and write new parts in that temperament/tuning.  I compiled a list of my favorite microtonal VST’s, synths, AU’s, and plugins. There are more synths out there, but these are my favorite.

You will also see a few rows that are highlighted green. These synths are my all-time favorite for working with Microtonal music.

If you have suggestions, please comment below. I would love to check them out and maybe add them to the list. If you are interested in learning more about tuning instruments in Ableton Live and microtonal music, then check out my article on Microtonal Music in Ableton Live. 

Bitwig Studio 2 Coming Out – First Thoughts

Bitwig just announced Version 2 to come out in February 2017. I’ve been reading about this on forums, and they just officially announced it.

I made this video to share my first thoughts on Bitwig 2 and what I hope to see in the update. There are also so interesting moves by them around pricing and subscription models.  Enjoy:

 

 

To read more on Bitwig 2 go to: https://www.bitwig.com/en/home.html

Ultimate Guide to 432 – VST’s and AU Plugins

In the first part of this series, we went over the theory of Tuning and Temperament.  Then I went into detail on tuning your synths in Ableton Live from 440 to 432 in part two of the series. In this article, I will walk you through using third party plugins, AU, and VST’s.

Third Party Plug-ins:

If you are like me then you might have a host of Third Party Plugins you like to use in your production. These extra synths give you a whole host of new sounds to play with. Here is a list of Plugins you can use and the where to find the parameter to detune the instrument.  This is in no particular order.

To start here is a video I made in response to questions of tuning Massive and Serum.

 

Massive: Go to the Global tab. Here change the global tuning to  -0.32

(more…)

By | 2017-06-28T19:50:09+00:00 January 12th, 2017|Ableton, Music Theory, Producers Blog, Sound Design Tech|2 Comments

Ultimate Guide to 432 – Using Ableton Live

Tuning into 432 with Live

To play music in 432 you must retune all your synths and presets. This might seem overwhelming idea at first, but it actually takes very little time at the beginning of your tracks. Once you get a library of instruments tuned, then it will also be that much easier.

The simplest way to tune to 432hz is to just detune each of your instruments. By detuning you lower the first note, from 440-432 for example.  since A=432 Live will then base every note from that point forward. You can not just lower the pitch at the end because that will not retune it, it will just lower the overall pitch.

This image shows the different tuning you could use for notes found in the Equal Temperament. As you can see when you move from 440 to 432 you are lowering the pitch by -8hz. You can also see that just 2 notes down 440hz Equal Temperament are 494. If you -8hz to that we do not get 484.90.  The reason why is equal temperament is a ratio that moved up from the root of A. A ratio of “2 11/12” from 440 is very different than a ratio of “2 11/12” at 432. Because of this, you can not return the finished song. You must tune the instruments correctly to start with. (more…)

By | 2017-06-28T19:50:12+00:00 January 12th, 2017|Ableton, Music Theory, Producers Blog, Sound Design Tech|1 Comment
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